by Tony Karp
Sunset and the far-up lens
 - It started about a quarter after 7pm, on a typical summer evening. This is behind my house, looking west. Looks like it's going to be a great sunset. But you can't get a wide view from here because of the trees that surround the property. So the Artist's Muse and I put on our walking shoes and headed out to our sunset-watching spot, about a mile away.<p></p>The journey you are about to see took about forty five minutes. I took 160 pictures to get the group you see here. <p></p>Think of it as a photo essay about one particular sunset. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
It started about a quarter after 7pm, on a typical summer evening. This is behind my house, looking west. Looks like it's going to be a great sunset. But you can't get a wide view from here because of the trees that surround the property. So the Artist's Muse and I put on our walking shoes and headed out to our sunset-watching spot, about a mile away.

The journey you are about to see took about forty five minutes. I took 160 pictures to get the group you see here.

Think of it as a photo essay about one particular sunset.

 - But first, the far-up lens. This is actually a reducing glass, the opposite of a magnifying glass. It's a three inch diameter lens on a handle, just like  a regular magnifier. But when you hold it in front of something, it makes it smaller instead of larger. And that's why I call it my far-up lens -- it's the opposite of the close-up lens. One use is to hold it out in front of the camera as if you were holding it in front of your eyes. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
But first, the far-up lens. This is actually a reducing glass, the opposite of a magnifying glass. It's a three inch diameter lens on a handle, just like a regular magnifier. But when you hold it in front of something, it makes it smaller instead of larger. And that's why I call it my far-up lens -- it's the opposite of the close-up lens. One use is to hold it out in front of the camera as if you were holding it in front of your eyes.
 - The far-up lens is big enough so that you can hold it in front of the camera's lens and take pictures through it. The effect is the same as you would get from a wide-angle adaptor -- it gives the camera a wilder field of view. And since the DMC-FZ18 already has a 28mm equivalent, the result is even wider, as you see here.  Note the curvature at the bottom of the image. Gives the horizon an interesting curve. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
The far-up lens is big enough so that you can hold it in front of the camera's lens and take pictures through it. The effect is the same as you would get from a wide-angle adaptor -- it gives the camera a wilder field of view. And since the DMC-FZ18 already has a 28mm equivalent, the result is even wider, as you see here. Note the curvature at the bottom of the image. Gives the horizon an interesting curve.
Bird on a wire - So we started out down our road and then a left turn onto a road that soon turns to dirt and gravel, but is very hilly, with lots of good places to watch a sunset. Along the way, we saw this young bird who was also watching the sunset. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
So we started out down our road and then a left turn onto a road that soon turns to dirt and gravel, but is very hilly, with lots of good places to watch a sunset. Along the way, we saw this young bird who was also watching the sunset.
A young deer at sunset - Further on, we saw this young deer, also waiting for the sunset. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Further on, we saw this young deer, also waiting for the sunset.
 - Almost there. Let's take a look through the far-up lens. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Almost there. Let's take a look through the far-up lens.
 - Nice vista. Sun's behind the clouds, but it will be out in a minute. Let's step back a little. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Nice vista. Sun's behind the clouds, but it will be out in a minute. Let's step back a little.
 - A wider view. Actually, it's a panorama. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
A wider view. Actually, it's a panorama.
 - That's some view. The sun looks mighty small from here. Let's get closer. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
That's some view. The sun looks mighty small from here. Let's get closer.
 - This is what you can do with a camera with an 18X zoom lens. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
This is what you can do with a camera with an 18X zoom lens.
 - Stepping back a little bit. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Stepping back a little bit.
 - Here we can see the clouds overhead. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Here we can see the clouds overhead.
 - And a little further back. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
And a little further back.
 - The sunset in a single picture. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
The sunset in a single picture.
 - The sunset in a panorama. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
The sunset in a panorama.
 - Moving in a little bit for another look at the sun dropping behind the mountain. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Moving in a little bit for another look at the sun dropping behind the mountain.
 - Here's the same shot through the far-up lens. Notice how much wider the scene is. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Here's the same shot through the far-up lens. Notice how much wider the scene is.
 - Here's a vertical view through the far-up lens. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Here's a vertical view through the far-up lens.
 - A last look through the far-up lens. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
A last look through the far-up lens.
 - One last close-up as the sun drops below the mountain. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
One last close-up as the sun drops below the mountain.
 - One last wide angle shot. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
One last wide angle shot.
 - One last panorama as the sun falls behind the mountain. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
One last panorama as the sun falls behind the mountain.
 - Time for one last look down the road. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Time for one last look down the road.
 - Still time for a 1930's telephone pole motif. And finally... - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Still time for a 1930's telephone pole motif. And finally...
 - Au revoir, Monseiur Soleil. À bientôt. - - art  - photography - by Tony Karp
Au revoir, Monseiur Soleil. À bientôt.
Note: The "far-up" lens is an artist's reducing glass. It looks like a three inch diameter magnifier, but it makes things smaller instead of bigger. They're inexpensive and you can find one in a store that sells art supplies or quilting supplies.
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Copyright 1958-2016 Tony & Marilyn Karp